• May 14, 2021
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On April 7, 2021, Roy Cooper, the Governor of North Carolina announced that all North Carolinians sixteen and older can receive the COVID-19 vaccine. 

Cooper’s announcement came one day before all high schoolers who signed up for Plan B learning would be entering school after almost a year.

As of April 13, 2021, only the Pfizer vaccine is approved for Americans as young as sixteen. 

Although sixteen year olds can get the vaccine, some at Leesville got their vaccinations before April 7. Reasons ranging from they work at essential businesses or they received the opportunity to get the vaccine from leftovers at distribution centers.

On April 7, 2021, Roy Cooper, the Governor of North Carolina announced that all North Carolinians sixteen and older can receive the COVID-19 vaccine. 

Cooper’s announcement came one day before all high schoolers who signed up for Plan B learning would be entering school after almost a year.

As of April 13, 2021, only the Pfizer vaccine is approved for Americans as young as sixteen. 

Vaccinated Students

Leftover Vaccines

Josh Phillips, a senior at Leesville, received his first dose of the vaccine on March 19 and the second dose on April 16. 

Phillips received the Moderna vaccine. “I got my shot because I think it is important to be a part of this journey,” Phillips typed over Google Docs. “I also wanted to be as helpful to society as I can.”

Phillips received the vaccine as doses were being handed out at HealthPark in Raleigh. “My mom was watching different websites to see if there was availability to get a shot,” Phillips typed. “She saw that a clinic had extra shots, so we got in the car and went.”

Many people are still hesitant over getting the vaccine for various reasons, but Phillips was not. “I trust the people who are responsible for making the shot,” Phillips typed. “I think everyone should trust science because that will make the progress go way quicker.”

Although Phillips has both doses, he is still going to be cautious. “I would feel more comfortable going out with the vaccine because it will make the effects of COVID be less,” Phillips typed. “Just because I have the vaccine does not mean that I’m immune.”

Ahead of the Curve

Caroline Phillips, a sophomore at Leesville, received her first dose of the vaccine weeks before all sixteen year olds in North Carolina could. 

Phillips received the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine on March 19 and her second dose on April 9. “I got the vaccine because I know the effects the virus can have on people and how dangerous it can be,” Phillips typed over Google Docs. “I didn’t want me or my family to go through any of that.”

As Phillips’ brother stated, their mother found last-minute vaccine leftovers. “Luckily they did and I received one of the last doses of the Pfizer vaccine the pharmacy had left.”

“I wasn’t really scared to get the vaccine because even though I don’t like getting shots, I knew that it was a way to protect me and my family from the virus,” Phillips typed. “I was only anxious waiting in line because I didn’t know if I was going to be able to have one or not.”

Phillips struggled with herself after she received the vaccine before April 7. “I was extremely grateful to have received a vaccine because then I could help keep me and my family safe,” Phillips typed. “The other part of me felt slightly guilty because I felt as if I was taking the vaccine from someone that needed it more than I did.”

“It took me a little while to get over that after I continued to remind myself that I received an extra dose of the vaccine and I didn’t take it from someone else.”

Wait Your Turn

Abbey Ake, a sophomore, will be receiving her dose of the Pfizer vaccine on April 16. 

Ake wanted to have the vaccine to help keep her family safe and to do more in-person activities. 

Ake has no fear for the vaccine. “I have had friends get it, my grandparents, and parents without any major issues,” Ake typed over Google Docs.

Although other sixteen year olds have gotten the vaccine early, Ake was not aware she could have. “I wanted to make sure all testing could be done was done before I got it,” Ake typed. “Partially to keep myself safe but also to make sure the people that really needed it got it.”

Ake will definitely feel safer going out with the vaccine. “I will still double mask as a sign of respect and to help keep my younger sister safe,” Ake typed. “But, being able to hang out with other friends and family will be really nice without worrying a ton.”

Ultimately, whenever you can receive the vaccine, you should if you choose to do so.

Author

ddwilkerson@students.wcpss.net
Hi! My name is Dayna and I am a staff writer for The Mycenaean. I am also a member of Model UN and Food Bank Club.

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