• October 24, 2020
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Victor Walker (left) and Brian Waldron (right) compete in a Rubik’s Cube battle. A good time to solve a cube is 30 seconds or less.

On Thursday, April 19 the Cube Club hosted its annual speedcubing competition. Members of the club competed in various rounds to discover the winner.

First, the competitors mix up each others’ cubes. There are 43 quintillion possible combinations in solving a Rubik’s cube. However, no matter how much the cube is mixed up, it is at the most 20 moves away from being solved. They then hold their hands on the Rubik’s cube timers and start at a count of “3, 2, 1, go.”

“It makes it more fun to compete,” commented Luke Taylor, president. So far, the club has had success in attendance until a recent decline. “We’ve formed a pretty tight niche and now are trying to get higher attendance.”

There are many different methods of solving the cube, such as the Petris, Friedrichs, Beginners, Keyhole and Corners First methods.

“When I thought about forming the Cube Club, I told myself that I wouldn’t create it until a stranger told me to,” said Taylor.

“I started [solving Rubik’s Cubes] in the middle of the year because I saw my friend Max doing it on his way to class,” said D’lante Perry, freshman.

The club meets every other Thursday in room 210, and will hold its next meeting May 3.

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