• December 5, 2020
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It’s that merry time of year again: cheerful jingles are invading television and radio stations, causing listeners to plug their ears as they wail in pain and fury.

Tis the season to be prematurely jolly, and for companies to market everything Christmas-related before Thanksgiving has even occurred. America’s favorite tunes from the famous “Now That’s What I Call Christmas” album are beginning to pour through the air, such as “Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer” and “(It Must Have Been Ol’) Santa Claus”.

Of course, these acts of early celebration are unmistakably a corporate ruse to sell, sell, sell. Who wouldn’t want to buy reindeer pajamas and Christmas trees in early November?

The question is, does this pre-holiday advertising steal the spotlight from Thanksgiving? Are the jubilant sounds of eating and bickering family members drowned out by incessant Christmas jingles?

“I turned on the radio on Sunday and there was Christmas music playing on 100.7. I was appalled,” said Maggie Young, senior, with despair. “I feel like Thanksgiving is ignored because it’s in the shadow of Christmas. The Christmas parade is this Saturday, and at that point there’s no turning back.”

Marial Tsikos, junior, already has her Christmas tree ready to be decorated. “Actually it’s just in a bag on the floor,” said Tsikos. “But I think Christmas is a joyous time of year filled with gingerbread men and cookies. Usually I hate everyone but when Christmas comes I turn into this ball of angelic light. People see me and they’re like, ‘who is that divine angel?’ — I’m the Christmas spirit.”

Through all the controversy and marketing flimflam, participants of the holiday season should remember the true meaning of the celebrations. Thanksgiving and Christmas bring family members closer and create lasting memories. It’s not just about food and presents: fumbling to put up festive lights, 24 hour re-runs of A Christmas Story and trying to keep the relatives from poking each other’s eyes out are all part of filling the holiday season with warmth and love.

So next time you hear a festive ditty, recall that time your parents drank a little too much eggnog and get ready for the holidays.

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