Anti-PSAT: the alternative to testing

By cue of the morning bell on Wednesday, October 12, Leesville students shuffled off to their respective classrooms, most of them more glum than usual to begin first period.

Because of PSAT testing, first and second period have been combined into one 3-hour block while sophomores and a handful of juniors take the exam.

Most students not taking the PSAT are happy to be in their lengthy first period classes. Aryn Kreuger, senior, views her first period as the best class to be “stuck” in. “I love [art IV],” said Kreuger, “[with three hours] you can really get in the zone of art and do your thing without distractions or breaks.”

Additionally, art students are allowed more flexibility when it comes to class time. “We always listen to music [during class], too, so I’m actually looking forward to [class],” said Kreuger.

Other students in more rigorous courses worry about an information overload. “I’ll be in AP Chemistry, and I feel kind of overwhelmed,” explained Connor Blevins, senior. “[Three hours] is a long time to be in one class.”

Blevins also expressed concern over missing a day of second period. “[The extended class] disadvantages your second period class because the time you miss is never fully made up.”

Some teachers compensate for the extra hours they will have their students by implementing fun activities. “If we weren’t having a movie day tomorrow, I don’t know if I could handle it,” said Maria Cain, senior in AP English of her double-period.

Cain is not terribly worried about missing her second period. “I have creative writing second period and a lot of assignments can be worked on outside of class.”

As a way to compensate for the missed class time, an extra thirty minutes will be added to second period on Thursday, October 13.

Despite different concerns about the testing period’s effect on other classes, a majority of students would rather be in their first period than taking the PSAT.

Zane Williams, senior in Religions, firmly preferred his situation by not taking the PSAT. “I’d rather be in first period easily, I can talk and goof off instead of test.”

And what student wouldn’t want that?

About the Author

Virginia Reed, Online Editor
Virginia Reed is a superb writer and an even better friend. She enjoys unhealthy foods and writing sarcastic articles. Virginia is the Online Editor for the 2011-12 school year and was a Managing Editor for the 2010-11 year but has not forgotten her humble beginnings as a staff writer when she was a wee sophomore. Her goals for the future are to get an A in newspaper and to apply to college in a timely fashion.

1 Comment on "Anti-PSAT: the alternative to testing"

  1. Grace Harvey | October 19, 2011 at 1:28 am |

    Fight the powers that be

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