• October 16, 2019
0 Comments

NCMA’s expansive park is full of unique sculptures and functional art installations; their latest is no exception to the idea of unique design with a new purpose. Back in May, artist Heather Hart added colorful rooftops to the museum — not onto the building, however, but instead into the ground. 

Hart’s website is a sleek collection of all her works and projects with a common theme — architecture with a new purpose — even her drawings portray this idea. Her goal is to create functional structures that serve multiple purposes that contrast their typical uses. Hart wants to take something conventional — like a simple roof — and give it new meaning and impact by placing it in an entirely different environment. 

Southern Oracle: We Will Tear the Roof Off is the epitome of her style. The rainbow-painted wood slats seemingly blend into the hillside as if a home were dropped from the sky; it has classic shingles and even a chimney, the only abnormal aspect are the PVC pipe railings ensuring the safety of the patrons.  

The inside, however, is a blank canvas compared to the outside. Unstained yellowish wood slats became platforms and stages for visitors to have picnics, to relax, and for younger kids to explore a small but entirely unique world. There are four entries — a doorway at the base of the hill, an empty window by the side of the structure, and two empty windows that outcrop from the roof. Each entry seemed to draw different people: The younger visitors aimed for the riskier window entries while the adults aimed for the doorway and relied on the railings on the roof.  

Another unique addition to the exhibit was an AUX cord. Yes, an AUX cord that allowed anyone to play whatever music they wished to. It would seemingly come from the sky since there were no speakers visible, just the illusion of encapsulating music. 

The seamless blend of multiple mediums to serve a single purpose of bringing people together is achieved by this out-of-the-box structure but won’t last forever. It will close on October 31 and will make home elsewhere when it falls from the sky once again. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.